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Archive for the ‘freighting’ Category

Jerome & Lucy (Underwood) Thomas

In Clive AB, Entertainment, Farming, freighting, Pioneer Farming, Settlers, theft, Trails on February 21, 2021 at 12:21 AM

From “The Jerome Thomas Story – by Howard Thomas”

Pioneers and Progress, Alix Clive Historical Club, 1974

Jerome Thomas was born in 1854 and his wife the former Lucy Underwood was born the same year.  Grandfather came by democrat the year before moving up from Iowa to the Clive area about 1901.  His possessions were shipped to Lacombe and then moved out by wagon.  Their homestead is … NW 22-40-24-4. 

Grandma ran a “stopping house” for travellers freighting between Lacombe and Red Willow on the old Buffalo Lake trail.  This trip used to take 3-4 days.  They used to hang a lantern from the peak of the roof out the upstairs window and this could be seen as you came over Church Hill….

One fellow tells how he used to stop for supper at Thomas’ and while he was inside eating, he had a bent pin through a kernel of corn tied to a string and fastened to the wagon outside. An old hen would swallow the corn and when the traveller drove off the chicken led behind firmly tethered by that string pinned in the corn.  Once driven over the hill, ole hen would get her neck wrung. [T]hus the fellow had his next day’s dinner as well.

The Thomas children were all musical.  There were Bert, Jess, Belle, Lorena, Will, Minnie, Jim and Roy.

They played for dances miles around the country and would travel in the winter by sleigh with hot stones to keep their feet warm.

Jerome Thomas died in 1912 and Lucy Thomas in 1918….

Roy the youngest son, never married.  He stayed on the family homestead for many years. His sister Lorena Handley kept house for him.

Rude-Rottenfusser part one

In 1930s Depression, Alix, Alberta, Business, Farming, freighting, Great Bend School, Hairdressers, Pioneer Farming on February 11, 2021 at 8:59 AM

From “Rude-Rottenfusser – by Mrs. Jenny Rottenfusser” part 1

Pioneers and Progress, Alix-Clive Historical Club, 1974

My parents, Olaf and Irene Rude, were visiting at the home of his brother, John, and Lena Rude when I was born. John had homesteaded the quarter south of Jim Blades in the Delburne district.  At that time, 1917, they lived in a log house on the bank of the Red Deer River.  In the spring Dad obtained work at Cadogan until a cyclone wiped out the farmer for whom he was working.

We moved to the Millet-Wetaskiwin area and lived there until I started school at Larch Tree.  Our family included Olga, Ivan, and Nels by now.  Dad always wanted to return to the lumber camps in B.C. where he had first worked after coming from Norway.  In the spring of 1925, my parents loaded everything in two hay-racks, one wagon and a buggy, and started south.  They had twelve horses.  Another fellow drove one outfit.   One hay-rack had a canvas over it, and we lived in that, travelling like early pioneers.  It took two weeks to reach Midnapore.  I remember Mom waking Olga and me to give us our first sight of Calgary, a row of lights on the horizon. Going through Calgary, under the railroad track, barefoot ragged kids stood, yelling and throwing things and calling us gypsies.

Dad and his friend obtained work hauling pipe to Turner Valley.  They unloaded the hay-rack beside Sheep River and there we camped for some time.  There were a lot of other people camped also.  Towards fall we lived in a house in Okotoks.  I went to Pine Creek School.  Just before Christmas Dad sold the horses and wagons, and we took the train to Nevis and hired a car to take us to Uncle John’s.  My brother, Carl, was born in March.  In the spring Dad went farming for Arthur Chaffin.  We lived in the district for many years. Gordon and Stuart were born later. We all obtained our schooling at the Great Bend School.

A farmer could work out his taxes by driving the school van, usually at the rate of of thirteen days to a quarter of land.  When I was in High School I drove the van for thirty-five cents a day. When I first started to work out I received eight dollars a month.

I moved to Alix in October, 1942, and opened Jenny’s Beauty Shoppe. There had not been one since Nancy Drushka had closed hers.  Perms were $2.50, $3.50, and $5.00.  When cold waves came in I charged $6.50.  A set was 50 cents, a shampoo and set, 75 cents.  For 10 cents they could get it combed out when it was dry.  I sold out to Jean Cosentino in 1947.

Earl Barnes Story

In Coal & wood heating, Farming, freighting, Nebraska District, Pioneer Farming, Pioneer tools & Machinery, Settlers, World War I on December 5, 2020 at 9:45 AM

From “The Earl Barnes Story”(from a story by Earl Barnes)

Pioneers and Progress, Alix-Clive Historical Club, 1974

I was born in Muskoka county, Ontario in 1895.  Dad kept sheep and did butchering for nearby hotels.  There were lots of tourists even then. In winter he worked in the bush, and he and his brothers were guides for hunters….

We then moved to North Bay where my Dad worked in the bush again. 

The last winter we were there Dad hired 19 men and with mother doing the cooking, they got big sleighs, one with a sprinkler on it, and made ice roads to haul the heavy loads.

…[w]hen we landed at Lacombe Dad had $40 left.

We lived 4 miles west of Lacombe in a house of Mr. Draders, all the kids got measles and Dad got pneumonia.  Dad got better and bought a team of oxen and went to work.  We then moved north of Bentley.  Dad bought a 22 rifle and about 6 shells and told me to keep meat on the table.  I went into the woods to get a partridge and shot off all my shells and every one hit a willow bush.  On the way home I saw something that stopped me in my tracks it was a lynx, and the longer I looked at it the bigger it got.  I guess I was the scaredest boy that ever lived.  Dad finally rescued me and by next spring I was out shooting by myself. We lived in a shack about 12 x 16 feet.  We had one little stove and since we did not have coal oil for a lamp, we used to leave the stove door open for light in the evening. Mother and us kids never saw Dad until he came home in the spring.  In 1909 Dad got a job in Lacombe and worked for Carl Nelson in a harness and shoe repair shop.  This man had SW1/4-41-24 W4 in the Nebraska district and somehow, they made a trade and we moved out in 1910.  It was closer to school.  In 1915 Dad joined the army and went to England and France.  I went in 1918 but only got to Sarcee camp in Calgary.

Rude-Rottenfusser part one

In 1930s Depression, Alix, Alberta, Business, Delburne, Farming, freighting, Great Bend School, Hairdressers, Nevis, Pioneer Farming, School on March 1, 2020 at 8:56 AM

From “Rude-Rottenfusser – by Mrs. Jenny Rottenfusser” part 1

Pioneers and Progress, Alix-Clive Historical Club, 1974

My parents, Olaf and Irene Rude, were visiting at the home of his brother, John, and Lena Rude when I was born. John had homesteaded the quarter south of Jim Blades in the Delburne district.  At that time, 1917, they lived in a log house on the bank of the Red Deer River.  In the spring Dad obtained work at Cadogan until a cyclone wiped out the farmer for whom he was working.

We moved to the Millet-Wetaskiwin area and lived there until I started school at Larch Tree.  Our family included Olga, Ivan, and Nels by now.  Dad always wanted to return to the lumber camps in B.C. where he had first worked after coming from Norway.  In the spring of 1925, my parents loaded everything in two hay-racks, one wagon and a buggy, and started south.  They had twelve horses.  Another fellow drove one outfit.   One hay-rack had a canvas over it, and we lived in that, travelling like early pioneers.  It took two weeks to reach Midnapore.  I remember Mom waking Olga and me to give us our first sight of Calgary, a row of lights on the horizon. Going through Calgary, under the railroad track, barefoot ragged kids stood, yelling and throwing things and calling us gypsies.

Dad and his friend obtained work hauling pipe to Turner Valley.  They unloaded the hay-rack beside Sheep River and there we camped for some time.  There were a lot of other people camped also.  Towards fall we lived in a house in Okotoks.  I went to Pine Creek School.  Just before Christmas Dad sold the horses and wagons, and we took the train to Nevis and hired a car to take us to Uncle John’s.  My brother, Carl, was born in March.  In the spring Dad went farming for Arthur Chaffin.  We lived in the district for many years. Gordon and Stuart were born later. We all obtained our schooling at the Great Bend School.

A farmer could work out his taxes by driving the school van, usually at the rate of of thirteen days to a quarter of land.  When I was in High School I drove the van for thirty-five cents a day. When I first started to work out I received eight dollars a month.

I moved to Alix in October, 1942, and opened Jenny’s Beauty Shoppe. There had not been one since Nancy Drushka had closed hers.  Perms were $2.50, $3.50, and $5.00.  When cold waves came in I charged $6.50.  A set was 50cents, a shampoo and set, 75 cents.  For 10 cents they could get it combed out when it was dry.  I sold out to Jean Cosentino in 1947.