alixwagonwheelmuseum

Archive for the ‘Alix Creamery’ Category

Throwback Thursday – Central Alberta Dairy Pool

In Alix Creamery, Alix, Alberta on April 8, 2021 at 1:31 AM

from “Some Memories of My Years in Alix, and Its People” by Alice Whitfield

Art Foster was the engineer in charge of the boiler room and machinery.  Bert Smith also worked there…. Around 1932 Poultry and eggs were added to the business, and in the fall turkeys were loaded onto the dray from the farm trucks or wagons.  They were piled as high as was possible and as many as would stay on. (Very sanitary delivery in those days!) Needless to say it was not unusual for a few to fall off and be spoiled in transit….  I remember Jack Pears, Frank Brooker, and Gene Deen driving the old team with the dray.

One of the girls doing the egg candling was Katie Walper, and you could find her in the dark room looking through the egg against a light to see if it was fresh or had a chicken in it. A lot of the eggs came in cracked, and they tried making what they called Melange from the cracked eggs by beating them and freezing the mixture, but it didn’t work out too well.  Another product was powdered buttermilk which did have a really good market while there was plenty of cream.

When the new mechanical printer was installed, Mary Deen took over and worked there for many years….  The creamery story wouldn’t be complete without the mention of Okey Lundberg, who came with his wife, Ruth, from Rimbey where he had been the manager. He was active in the Alix Athletic Association which was responsible for building the arena…. Ruth Lundberg served as 4-H Girls Club leader for a number of years….

This article is taken from Gleanings, (the follow-up book to Pioneers and Progress), Alix-Clive Historical Club, 1981. Both books are available for sale at Alix Wagon Wheel Museum, Alix Public Library, and Alix Home Hardware.

IMG_1027

Butter-flavoured aluminum? Yes, that’s what was left when a fire destroyed the Central Alberta Dairy Pool in 1976. The fire was so hot that it melted the butter and the aluminum vats it was contained in. The liquid then moved into the sewer system and congealed – and we have a piece of it!

Brooker Family

In Alix Creamery, Alix, Alberta, Carpenters, Dance Band, Dance Band, Entertainment, Haynes on March 22, 2021 at 12:00 AM

From “Mr. and Mrs. Joe Brooker – by Stan Loughridge”

Gleanings from Pioneers and Progress ,Alix-Clive Historical Club, 1974

The Brooker family. Including Frank, Matt, and a sister, came to Alix from Calgary.  Mrs. Brooker had a beautiful singing voice, and sang in choirs in Calgary. The daughter looked like Mary Pickford, as Stan remembers.

The boys had an orchestra, Frank on drums, Matt Brooker and Lawrence Petit on saxophones, Walter Lissack on cornet, Floyd Cockrall on piano.  They played all over, Delburne, Haynes, Clive and Alix.  It was a snappy orchestra, quite a band.

All three Brooker men were carpenters and did a lot of contract work.  It was amazing how fast the three of them could put up a house. 

Frank worked at the creamery hauling with the truck; he also worked with the poultry or eggs.  He married Hazel Ryle and they went to Lloydminster.  Matt married Mary “Bunty” Grey and he went to work for Fish and Game.

Stan tells of a time that Matt Brooker returned a hunting rifle to his Dad.  Matt had been careful to empty the gun, and on more than one occasion Stan had taken the gun down off the wall to show to his friends.  On this particular occasion there was a deafening roar, and a bullet that must have been lodged in the magazine Needless to say, everyone standing around was quite shaken, and glad no one suffered the fate of the rocker.blew the rocker off the rocking chair.

Cuthbert and Margaret (McRoberts) Wolferstan

In Alix Creamery, Alix, Alberta, Churches, Dairy Pool, Famous 5 Persons Case, Farming, Hickling, Lamerton, Mirror AB, Organizations, Pioneer Medical Health, Political Parties, Ripley, School, School Trustees, Settlers, Trails, U.F.A., Wheat Pool on March 8, 2021 at 1:53 AM

From “Cuthbert Wolferstan – by Peggy Wolferstan Purkis”

Pioneers and Progress, Alix Clive Historical Club, 1974

Cuthbert Wolferstan was born in Plymouth, Devon, England, where he was educated and grew up.  His father was a solicitor (barrister) and had as one of his clients the Rev. John Hall Parlby … whose two sons Walter and Edward had settled earlier in the Buffalo Country.   It was natural then that Cuthbert (Bert) should come out to Canada with a nephew of the Parlbys, Jack Arbuthnott, and that they both should make their first Canadian homes at Dartmoor and Long Valley Ranches.

After working for Edward Parlby some little time, Bert Wolferstan went to work for … Edwin Goater who had homesteaded west of the present site of Mirror.

In 1905 he filed on his own homestead six miles north of [Alix.]

Having proved up on the homestead, he sold his livestock and went to work for a time in and around Edmonton.  It was just then that the University of Alberta was being started.  Bert … was called upon with his team to turn the first sod.  This was done the evening before the official beginning.  The site was carefully ploughed, then the sod was rolled back in place as though undisturbed.  The next day, with Premier Rutherford driving the team and the University President Dr. H.M. Tory at the handles of the walking plough, the first furrow turned over without a hitch.

Bert’s next adventure was an exploratory trip into the country north of Edmonton … and he returned to the homestead.  In December of 1910 he married Margaret McRoberts, who had come from Belfast, Northern Ireland, and was nursing in Edmonton….

It was during these early years that Bert Wolferstan and John Bailey with their teams opened up a wagon trail which wound through the hills to the little hamlet of Alix.

Between the years of 1912 and … 1916 three children were born…: Margaret, or Peggy – now [1974] Mrs. Ronald Purkis- lives on the homestead; Nancy – Mrs. Joe Drushka of Alix; and a son Thomas who now lives in Mirror.

In 1916 Bert Wolferstan became the proud owner of a Model T Ford.  Before he had time to become a practical driver, he took his young family for a little ride. The car was going well but he wanted to stop it and was not sure just how to accomplish this. His solution was to drive it into the soft butt of a haystack.  The car stopped.

Mrs. Wolferstan, as a trained nurse, was often called upon to help in emergencies. She brought many of the children of pioneers into the world.  She nursed with Dr. A.E. Chown.  Dr. McLellan was a very good doctor….

The Wolferstans were always very active community people and members of the Anglican Church. Bert was vestryman and warden, first at St. Monica’s Lamerton (later Mirror), and in his later years at St. Pancras, Alix…. Bert was one of the prime movers in the building of the Hickling School…. later he became a trustee and then Secretary-Treasurer of the Alix Board.

Bert Wolferstan was active in the Farm Movement… and one of the first members of the United Farmers of Alberta…. Working with George Bell, a farmer of the Ripley District… he scoured the country for contract signers for the Alberta Wheat Pool…. With Fred MacDonald and Jack May he spear-headed a drive to organize the Buffalo Lake Livestock Co-operative.

When the United Farmers of Alberta entered politics he became Secretary of the Constituency Association, and was returning officer during the Honorable Irene Parlby’s campaigns. An original member of the Central Alberta Dairy Pool he served on that Board as delegate, and then as Chairman.

Alix 1956

In Alix Creamery, Alix, Alberta, Business on December 13, 2020 at 12:01 PM

From Survey of Alix Dept. of Industry & Development, Government of the Province of Alberta

from “Rude-Rottenfusser by Mrs. Jenny Rottenfusser” part 2

In Alix Creamery, Alix, Alberta, Boy Scouts, Carroll, Cattle, Farming, Hairdressers, Horses, Organizations, Railway, School, Settlers, World War !! on December 1, 2020 at 8:38 AM

Pioneers and Progress, Alix-Clive Historical Club, 1974

Albert Rottenfusser bought the W1/2-26-39-22-W4 in the spring of 1940.  This was Hudson’s Bay land which had been farmed by Jim Carroll. On May 4th Albert and his brother John came from Stettler bringing horses and machinery with which to farm.  As there were no buildings on the place they hauled out a granary in which to live.

During the summer John and Albert bought a cottage at Buffalo Lake which consisted of three rooms and a screened-in veranda.  It was not lined inside so was terribly cold in the winter; the tea kettle would freeze on the stove. Ten head of horses were moved to move the building until they came to the sand hill between Ira Mann’s and home.  To get up the hill it took fourteen horses, Tony De Wald’s tractor, blocks and tackle.  A brother-in-law, Vernon Bignell, also helped.

Mr. and Mrs. John Rottenfusser Sr. had homesteaded in the Botha district, after coming from the state of Washington.  Mrs. Rottenfusser, and her eldest daughter, Mary, then a baby, were on the first passenger train that ran from Lacombe to Stettler in the fall of 1905.  In December 1940 they moved to the Alix district, buying the Peterman farm in the Ripley district….

Vernon and Frances Bignell came to the old Abe Carroll homestead west of Lee and Carl Carroll’s in 1945….

During the war years Albert served in the R.C.A.F.  His brother John and his wife, Alice, lived on the farm.  In 1944 the taxes for the north quarter were $39.09 and for the south quarter $$41.16; in 1973 the taxes on the same were $136.80 and $130.72.  In March 1947 Paul Winters drilled a well for Albert.  It was 210 feet deep, total price $329.75….     Albert and I were married in Lacombe….

Brian was born September 4, 1947, and Wanda on July 4, 1949.  When Wanda was a baby, we got a new roof and remodelled the house, turning the veranda into a kitchen and dining room.

We bought Mrs. Sibert’s land, NW1/4 27-39-22 through the V.L.A. in 1952. We also got our first tractora Model D Case….

Carroll School closed in June 1953.  In September, when Brian started school, the children were bussed into Alix.  Ned Barritt was our bus driver, a job he held for sixteen years.  The Carroll Community Club bought the school as a community center….

We had Aberdeen Angus range cows, but Holstein milk cows, and shipped cream to Alix Creamery.  It was much easier after we got electricity and a milking machine.

Albert took an active interest in the Canadian Order of Foresters and was Leader of Boy Scouts until his illness and passing in 1966.

Some years the berries were in abundance.  It would be like a picnic, with neighbour ladies coming to pick and having coffee….

Brian is working for his Masters in Geology at the time of this writing [1974] …. Wanda and I stayed on the farm  until she graduated from grade 12.  In 1967 we moved to Calgary when she entered university….

Central Alberta Dairy Pool

In 1930s Depression, Alix Creamery, Alix, Alberta, Business, Dairy Pool on March 1, 2020 at 9:52 PM

Central Alberta Dairy Pool part 2

from “Some Memories of My Years in Alix, and Its People” by Alice Whitfield

Art Foster was the engineer in charge of the boiler room and machinery.  Bert Smith also worked there…. Around 1932 Poultry and eggs were added to the business, and in the fall turkeys were loaded onto the dray from the farm trucks or wagons.  They were piled as high as was possible and as many as would stay on. (Very sanitary delivery in those days!) Needless to say it was not unusual for a few to fall off and be spoiled in transit….  I remember Jack Pears, Frank Brooker, and Gene Deen driving the old team with the dray.

One of the girls doing the egg candling was Katie Walper, and you could find her in the dark room looking through the egg against a light to see if it was fresh or had a chicken in it. A lot of the eggs came in cracked, and they tried making what they called Melange from the cracked eggs by beating them and freezing the mixture, but it didn’t work out too well.  Another product was powdered buttermilk which did have a really good market while there was plenty of cream.

When the new mechanical printer was installed, Mary Deen took over and worked there for many years….  The creamery story wouldn’t be complete without the mention of Okey Lundberg, who came with his wife, Ruth, from Rimbey where he had been the manager. He was active in the Alix Athletic Association which was responsible for building the arena…. Ruth Lundberg served as 4-H Girls Club leader for a number of years….

This article is taken from Gleanings, (the follow-up book to Pioneers and Progress), Alix-Clive Historical Club, 1981. Both books are available for sale at Alix Wagon Wheel Museum, Alix Public Library, andAlix Home Hardware.

The Alix Free Press March 27, 1931

In 1930s Depression, Alix Creamery, Alix, Alberta, Business, Coal Mining, Dairy Pool on January 4, 2020 at 1:22 PM

From “Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Illsley”

In 1930s Depression, Alix Creamery, Business, Oats, Pioneer Farming, Railway, School Teachers, Settlers, Wheat on January 3, 2020 at 1:00 AM

From “Mr. and Mrs. H.M. Illsley”

Pioneers and Progress, Alix Clive Historical Club, 1974

My wife and I were both Nova Scotians by birth…. [In ] April 1913… we went west to get rich.

I worked in Calgary for the C.P.R. for one year and was told of a half section that could be homesteaded as the original man had to move…. A new railway line was surveyed within half a mile and the grade was.  within seventy miles, and still is [1974] the location of Garden Plains Coal mine, post office and store. There was mail three times a week.  This sounded pretty good to a greenhorn. But it actually was nineteen miles north of Richdale and twenty-seven from Hanna, nearly thirty from Castor and twenty-one from Coronation or in other words nineteen miles from anywhere and two miles to the start of Berry Creek where we had to get our water as it was just about the same distance to drill for water.

In 1915 there was a wonderful crop of grain all over; of course, I did not have but about fifty acres ready.  We decided we wanted to be nearer to town so my wife got a school to teach near Coronation and I finally rented a half-section quite near.  First year there were eighty acres of wheat, and one hundred sixty of oats.  We were hailed out; just two loads of oat bundles, no wheat.  Second year one hundred sixty acres of wheat and eighty of oats.  There was no rain until it was too late to produce a decent crop, eight bushels of No. 6, no oats to mention.

The third time trying was sure to be good, but no luck. Hail and frost did their worst.  That was enough.  I sold the cattle and the hay I had stacked and turned the horses out as per usual.  We went to the west coast…. Edmonton…. Nova Scotia …and Boston…then back to Alberta in early April of 1921.  We went to Edmonton and Imperial Oil said I could have their agency in Clive and told me to go look over the situation.

We stayed at the Reynolds Hotel and became fast friends with the Reynolds family.  This had been a very hard winter and feed was very scarce.  Jim Fife was buying carloads of oat sheaves wherever he could get them dug out of the snow and shipping it to various places.  We decided to stay there and get a place to live as soon as possible.  I went to Coronation to get our horses… and move our furniture, farm wagon and sled and buggy…. Got everything loaded and the freight train pulled out early in the morning.  About half way to Clive we met the passenger train and learned that Clive was well on the way to being totally lost by fire.  As I remember it was the post office, one store, the bank and a small apartment block, nearly half the Village.  The livery barn was not burned so got the horses unloaded and fed and we went to the hotel for supper.

The Reynolds had an old warehouse they told me I could store things in…. My wife got a school for the summer term up near Vegreville, while I bought a site from the old Townsite Co….

I think the first building was twelve by twenty feet, I bought this and started buying cream for the Woodland Dairy, Edmonton…. [I] was starting a store on a shoestring…. I made my holder for charge accounts out of a smooth board and fastened fifteen mouse traps so had room for fifteen accounts….

My wife was teaching at Westling at this time and I soon had to have help as the cream by this time was pretty well all going to Alix and I had got more groceries as well as flour and fruit; so, Helen Reynolds came to help in the store.  Took on the Cockshutt plow agency…. My wife was now in the store and by this time we had to deliver oil.  I bought a truck and employed Milton Coote.  He married Helen Reynolds and they were with me until after the crash of 1929…. It was about 1924 that we sold so much farm machinery, seed drills and harrows and ploughs and in the fall, we sold seventeen Frost and Wood no. 4 binders….

I was Mayor of Clive from 1936-43…. Sam Scott was Secretary-treasurer, Mr. Coote was one member, also Harry Williams…. Douglas Wilson. I got out in 1943 and was in B.C. for a while….My wife passed away… in March 1948.   I have since married Miss Ida W. hunt who taught at Clive from 1926to 1932….

Alix Free Press Jan.23, 1931

In 1930s Depression, Alix Creamery, Alix, Alberta, Railway on June 8, 2019 at 8:23 AM

C.N.R. Alix Timetable Circular Letter from the Central Alberta Dairy Pool