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Threshing Time at the Thomas Farm

In Farming, Leedale, Pioneer Farming, Pioneer tools & Machinery, Threshing on April 27, 2021 at 12:56 PM

From “Threshing Time – by Howard and Iona Thomas”

Gleanings After Pioneers and Progress, Alix Clive Historical Club, 1981

A tribute is due all the farmers for all their hard work, long hours, and worry through the spring, summer and fall: their reward being a crop that was in the granary before the first snow fell.

A tribute also to the farmers’ wives, for the extra chores they carried while the husbands were away threshing.  For their long hours of cooking and baking, and making sure that lunch was to the field on time.  Their reward was the thrill of watching strong men devour great quantities of home cooking, and, once in a while, even getting a few compliments. After tummies were full, with a fresh burst of energy, the men would take off for work again, determined to get the crop in before winter caught them.

To a small boy, the best part of threshing was lunch in the field with Dad and the threshing crew! 

To the threshermen, the challenge of a hard job well done!  They always took great pride in their well cared for teams of horses.  The horses were fed first thing in the morning, at noon, and properly cared for at night, before the men had breakfast or supper.  Anyone that would mistreat horses soon went down the road.

We had five young fellows from Leedale District who came to thresh with us for five years in a row. They were the Herringer twins, Harry and Harold, Joe and Ivan Cornforth, and Bruce Johnson. 

Pike and Ella Thomas always raised turkeys, and every year the story went something like this, “That sure is a beautiful bunch of turkeys out there, Ella.  I guess I’ll have to steal one of them some night and have a turkey feed,” says Joe.  “If you can catch that big gobbler, “says Ella, “I’ll cook it!”  To make a long story short, the gobbler always lost his head, and the threshers had a full course turkey dinner.

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