alixwagonwheelmuseum

Archive for February, 2021|Monthly archive page

Photos from the Alix Wagon Wheel Museum

In Alix, Alberta on February 28, 2021 at 5:34 PM
Luggage and pull-around Beam Scale
Girl’s winter coat and leggings

Closeup Photo of a Spinning Demonstration

In Alix, Alberta, Spinning on February 21, 2021 at 1:22 PM

Jerome & Lucy (Underwood) Thomas

In Clive AB, Entertainment, Farming, freighting, Pioneer Farming, Settlers, theft, Trails on February 21, 2021 at 12:21 AM

From “The Jerome Thomas Story – by Howard Thomas”

Pioneers and Progress, Alix Clive Historical Club, 1974

Jerome Thomas was born in 1854 and his wife the former Lucy Underwood was born the same year.  Grandfather came by democrat the year before moving up from Iowa to the Clive area about 1901.  His possessions were shipped to Lacombe and then moved out by wagon.  Their homestead is … NW 22-40-24-4. 

Grandma ran a “stopping house” for travellers freighting between Lacombe and Red Willow on the old Buffalo Lake trail.  This trip used to take 3-4 days.  They used to hang a lantern from the peak of the roof out the upstairs window and this could be seen as you came over Church Hill….

One fellow tells how he used to stop for supper at Thomas’ and while he was inside eating, he had a bent pin through a kernel of corn tied to a string and fastened to the wagon outside. An old hen would swallow the corn and when the traveller drove off the chicken led behind firmly tethered by that string pinned in the corn.  Once driven over the hill, ole hen would get her neck wrung. [T]hus the fellow had his next day’s dinner as well.

The Thomas children were all musical.  There were Bert, Jess, Belle, Lorena, Will, Minnie, Jim and Roy.

They played for dances miles around the country and would travel in the winter by sleigh with hot stones to keep their feet warm.

Jerome Thomas died in 1912 and Lucy Thomas in 1918….

Roy the youngest son, never married.  He stayed on the family homestead for many years. His sister Lorena Handley kept house for him.

Alix Horticultural Club

In Alix, Alberta, Clubs & Associations, Entertainment, Fairs, Flowers, Gardens, Organizations, U.F.W.A. on February 15, 2021 at 11:09 AM

From “Alix Horticultural Club – by A. Nielsen”

Pioneers and Progress, Alix Clive Horticultural Club, 1974

In the spring of 1947 Mrs. Minn Thorp, an ardent gardener, thought it would be a good thing to have a Horticulture Club in Alix.  So on the afternoon of April 12, 1947, about forty people gathered in the U.F.A. Hall.  Mr. Gordon Sterling, District Agriculturalist from Lacombe, was present, and after showing an interesting film he gave some very helpful advice on organizing a horticulture club.

The newly elected officers were: Honorary President, Mrs. Irene Parlby; President, Mrs. C. Thorp; Vice President, Mrs. Ashley; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. O. Lundberg; Directors, Mrs. Ed Jennings, Mrs. M. Schnepf, Mrs. M. Nielsen, Mrs. W.D. Clarke and Mrs. A. Mann.

The membership started at $1.00 per year…. They took over the Flower show from the U.F.W.A. as it was pretty much the same women who were active in both groups…. then the children’s garden project….

They oversee the landscaping of the Alix Cemetery… all through the years they have tried to demonstrate and teach better ways of gardening.  Therefore, experienced persons were asked to demonstrate pruning, grafting, flower arranging, dividing roots, informative slides and films….

In 1947 the Flower Show was put on by the U.F.W.A. and the Horticulture Society under the convenorship of Mrs. Olive Allan and Mrs. Thorp. There were forty-six classes…. A new feature was the presentation by the Royal Bank of an engraved silver tray to the exhibitor from the Alix district who won the largest number of points.  It was won by a large margin by Mrs. M.V. (Anne) Schnepf….

That fall was fabulous for vegetables, mammoth varieties, as we didn’t have a killing frost until October 3rd, so they decided to have a Vegetable Heavy-weight Championship Contest and Display, everyone to bring in large or odd vegetables…. The prize list had forty classes, all kinds of vegetables, sheaves of grain and grass, canned fruit, vegetables, pickles, and jellies, several classes for dahlias and gladioli, winter bouquets, and herbs….

Lacombe held the Provincial Show in 1961, and Alix Club assisted…. Then Alix held a Flower Tea in the U.F.A. Hall with 14 classes….

 Alix Horticulture Club affiliated with the Alix Athletic Association to be able to take advantage of the grant by the Government for fairs, so it became the Alix Athletic and Agriculture Association….

Mrs. C. Mansbridge and Mrs. D. Hayes were on the Board of the Provincial Horticulture Society for several years….

Vivian (Murdoch) Clarke

In 1930s Depression, Churches, Clive AB, Entertainment, Fairs, Farming, Organizations, Pioneer tools & Machinery, Railway, School, School Teachers on February 11, 2021 at 11:01 AM

From “My Memories of Clive – by Vivian (Murdoch) Clarke”

Gleanings After Pioneers and Progress Alix-Clive Historical Club, 1981

Who could forget the Village of Clive and the people who lived there during the Nineteen Thirties?  The events that took place at the Community Hall, the School Fair, the movies, plays, dances, and the Christmas Concerts?  The skating, the carnival, and hockey in the winter at the rink?  Ditzler’s ingenious toboggan on runners that was pulled behind the car.  The opening of the baseball season every 24th of May, with the parade and the Maypole dance.  The Strawberry Socials, the Swedish Picnics, the Chicken Suppers, the Box Socials, when the ladies’ decorated lunch boxes went to the highest bidder.

Septembers, with Arbor Day cleanup and tree planning ceremony at the school. George Vanderzyl, our Principal from the year I started school until the year I graduated.  Vic McCormack, jumping on his bike at recess, and racing to his Dad’s barber shop for the score during the World Series.  The school picnics at “the spring” on Grose’s Hill.

Mrs. Brereton’s Mission Band, Mrs. Allison and the United Church Sunday School, with its small church replica to receive our birthday pennies; the Baptist Church’s summer Bible School, and their annual Christmas Concert.

The trains, with their steam engines, that flattened small objects we placed on the tracks; and the dray that was always waiting at the station for trains to arrive; in winter; hitching our small sleighs behind the dray or  the farmers’ sleighs that were hauling grain to the elevators.

Watching Mr. Shore at work in his blacksmith shop; the Minstrel Shows, piano recitals, and chivarees.  The list is endless…. 

I can’t think of anywhere I would rather have gone to school or spent my childhood.

Rude-Rottenfusser part one

In 1930s Depression, Alix, Alberta, Business, Farming, freighting, Great Bend School, Hairdressers, Pioneer Farming on February 11, 2021 at 8:59 AM

From “Rude-Rottenfusser – by Mrs. Jenny Rottenfusser” part 1

Pioneers and Progress, Alix-Clive Historical Club, 1974

My parents, Olaf and Irene Rude, were visiting at the home of his brother, John, and Lena Rude when I was born. John had homesteaded the quarter south of Jim Blades in the Delburne district.  At that time, 1917, they lived in a log house on the bank of the Red Deer River.  In the spring Dad obtained work at Cadogan until a cyclone wiped out the farmer for whom he was working.

We moved to the Millet-Wetaskiwin area and lived there until I started school at Larch Tree.  Our family included Olga, Ivan, and Nels by now.  Dad always wanted to return to the lumber camps in B.C. where he had first worked after coming from Norway.  In the spring of 1925, my parents loaded everything in two hay-racks, one wagon and a buggy, and started south.  They had twelve horses.  Another fellow drove one outfit.   One hay-rack had a canvas over it, and we lived in that, travelling like early pioneers.  It took two weeks to reach Midnapore.  I remember Mom waking Olga and me to give us our first sight of Calgary, a row of lights on the horizon. Going through Calgary, under the railroad track, barefoot ragged kids stood, yelling and throwing things and calling us gypsies.

Dad and his friend obtained work hauling pipe to Turner Valley.  They unloaded the hay-rack beside Sheep River and there we camped for some time.  There were a lot of other people camped also.  Towards fall we lived in a house in Okotoks.  I went to Pine Creek School.  Just before Christmas Dad sold the horses and wagons, and we took the train to Nevis and hired a car to take us to Uncle John’s.  My brother, Carl, was born in March.  In the spring Dad went farming for Arthur Chaffin.  We lived in the district for many years. Gordon and Stuart were born later. We all obtained our schooling at the Great Bend School.

A farmer could work out his taxes by driving the school van, usually at the rate of of thirteen days to a quarter of land.  When I was in High School I drove the van for thirty-five cents a day. When I first started to work out I received eight dollars a month.

I moved to Alix in October, 1942, and opened Jenny’s Beauty Shoppe. There had not been one since Nancy Drushka had closed hers.  Perms were $2.50, $3.50, and $5.00.  When cold waves came in I charged $6.50.  A set was 50 cents, a shampoo and set, 75 cents.  For 10 cents they could get it combed out when it was dry.  I sold out to Jean Cosentino in 1947.

Photos from the Alix Wagon Wheel Museum

In Alix, Alberta on February 4, 2021 at 5:29 PM
Babies in Christening Gowns and Winter Clothing from the Collection
Winter Coat from the Clothing Collection
Coat and hat from the Clothing Collection

Fred and Annie Stalia Fisher

In Clive AB, Enterprise School, Farming, Infrastructure, Lakeside District, Pioneer Farming, Pioneer tools & Machinery, Railway, School, Settlers on February 1, 2021 at 9:58 AM

From “Mr. and Mrs. Fred B. Fisher”

Pioneers and Progress, Alix Clive Historical Club, 1974

Mr. and Mrs. Fred B. Fisher came from Kearney, Nebraska to Lacombe, Alberta and on March 1st, 1900, [they] and five daughters moved out 7 ½ miles south-east of Lacombe to the Lakeside district.  The family lived on a quarter section of land owned at that time by Mr. Darling.

Mr. Fisher purchased a team of horses, a walking plough and two sections of harrows. No one in this area owned a seed drill.  Mr. Fisher sowed his feed by broadcasting.  In his spare time Dad walked to his homestead in the Clive area and built a log house and barn on NW-20-40-24-4.

In 1903 we moved to the homestead 1 mile south-east of Clive.  The land was cleared by cutting huge trees and roots with an axe.

Directly across the trail was… the land [where] the first school was erected by Dad and some of the neighbors.  All of the labor was volunteered with no wages for anyone.

The name of this first school in the area was “Enterprise” No.701….

During this time several of the men, Dad included, prepared the site for the village of “Valley City” which was later named Clive – with a team of horses and a bob-sleigh.

Dad hauled lumber, groceries, etc. from Lacombe to Lamerton, Erskine and Alix as there were no railroads yet….

Dad, Mother and we children lived in the log house until 1918, when we moved to the Lakeside district.  Dad bought a half-section of land from Mr. Mole, who had built a lovely brick house here, in 1915.

There were quantities of delicious wild fruits, including saskatoons, chokecherries, raspberries, strawberries….

My mother’s name was Annie Stalia Fisher and our family consisted of 11 girls and I boy. They were Daisy, Myrtle, Ida (myself), Mildred, Lorena, Minnie, Rosie, Fred Jr., Josephine, Violet, Annie and Ruby….

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Johnson and their daughter Sarah, later she married Jim Grose; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Fisher and five daughters; Mrs. Ernie Short, Clem, Bill, Jennie and Grace, a baby in her mother’s arms; Mrs. Aden Joslin and her daughter rode on the same train coach from the States until we all landed in Lacombe.  Gussie, their daughter, teaching school in Minnesota, followed them here when summer holidays took place, later marrying Jim Tees.