alixwagonwheelmuseum

Archive for February, 2019|Monthly archive page

Coffee &Conversation

In Alix, Alberta on February 26, 2019 at 7:27 PM

Coffee & Conversation at the Museum

In Alix, AlbertaGardensOrganizations posted on February 19, 2019 at 7:23 PM  The event is March 13.

ALIX WAGON WHEEL MUSEUM March 13

PRESENTS

“WILD FLOWERS AND HYBRIDS:

LOW MAINTENANCE PLANTING FOR YOUR GARDEN”

WITH

VERNE WILLIAMS

MASTER GARDENER, HORTICULTURALIST

Wed., MARCH 13

7 p.m. at the museum.

FREE

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

QUESTIONS & DISCUSSION WELCOMEAdvertisements

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 No Responses«BEFOREAlice and Charles WestheadFebruary 16, 2019

Coffee & Conversation at the Museum March 13, 7 p.m.

In Alix, Alberta, Gardens, Organizations on February 19, 2019 at 7:23 PM

ALIX WAGON WHEEL MUSEUM

PRESENTS

“WILD FLOWERS AND HYBRIDS:

LOW MAINTENANCE PLANTING FOR YOUR GARDEN”

WITH

VERNE WILLIAMS

MASTER GARDENER, HORTICULTURALIST

Wed., MARCH 13

7 p.m. at the museum.

FREE

REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

QUESTIONS & DISCUSSION WELCOME

Alice and Charles Westhead

In Alix, Alberta, Organizations, Pioneer Farming, Settlers on February 16, 2019 at 9:02 AM

From “Charles and Alice Westhead – by B.G. Parlby”

Pioneers and Progress, Aix Clive Historical Club, 1974

Alice Charlotte Westhead (nee Byng-Hall) was born in England in the 1860’s.  She was educated in England and in India by governesses…. She was quite young when she married Captain Crofton of the British Imperial Army and for some time lived in India where his regiment was stationed.  After his death, she lived in England and later married Charles Westhead of Devonshire.

It was in about 1890 that the Westheads first came to Alberta…. In 1892, the Westheads came north to settle on … Sec 19-22-40, almost 30 miles straight east of Lacombe.  Alice was the first white woman to settle in this part.

The Westheads established a cattle and horse ranch…. Many a young man coming to this country found his first job on the Westhead Ranch.  There was a succession of foremen who bore much of the Ranch operations; among these were T.I.P. Willet and Charles Jamieson.

1898 brought the stampede of fortune hunters to the Klondike. A small party left the Ranch including Charles and Alice Westhead,, T.I.P. Willett … [t]he only one of the entire party to reach the Klondike….

The Boer War had broken out and Charlie returned to his old regiment [Imperial Yeomanry] and was soon in South Africa.

In his absence, Alice Westhead managed the ranch very efficiently…. When the first Agricultural Society was formed, Alice was made the president.

Mrs. Westhead made a trip to England during the time the C.P.R. was being built between Lacombe and Stettler (later on to Coronation).  On her return journey she travelled on the same ship as Sir Wm. Van Horne, at that time president of the C.P. Railway.  They became personal friends and Sir William asked Alice if he might name a town in her honour….  Now renamed as ALIX… (form of Alice).

Times were changing and in 1910 Mrs. Westhead sold out and returned to England [died there 22 June 1942].  Charlie later returned to Canada and lived in Victoria, B.C. where he died. [6 Jan. 1932]

Haunted Lakes – House of Col. E.L. Marryat

In Alix, Alberta, Images on February 15, 2019 at 12:38 PM

from Pioneers and Progress Alix Clive Historical Club, 1974

Marryat house at Haunted Lakes

Tools in the Tool Room

In Alix, Alberta on February 15, 2019 at 8:12 AM

A small sample of tools we have on display.

Geoffrey C. Bartlett Farming History

In 1930s Depression, McCleish, Pioneer Farming, Pioneer tools & Machinery, Sargent District, Settlers on February 13, 2019 at 8:09 AM

                                 From “The Geoffrey C. Bartlett Story”

                     Pioneers and Progress Alix Clive Historical Club, 1974

Coming from England in 1924 I landed in Vegreville in August of that year.  The work day was a 14 hour one, with a barn to sleep in and mice to tickle your feet at night.  Many a mosquito enjoyed an Englishman’s blood.  I discovered that skunks were far more generous than the Avon lady of today. [1974]  Leaving Vegreville in 1930 I moved to Dewberry, Alberta, buying a farm from a fellow who said his first machinery was an axe and unlimited ignorance.  The first crop I received 26 cents for wheat, $4.00 for a hog and $9.00 for steers.  This was the dirty thirties when survival was the order of the day.  My mode of travel was a Bennett buggy, no gas, no license, no insurance, only 8 cent oats.  Housing in those days for a bachelor was about a 10 X 12; if he built bigger folks said he was getting married.  Plumbing was officially inspected and passed by Mother Nature.  The school was on the corner of my farm and was used on Sunday for a church and also for community gatherings on the weekends….

In 1939 I sold and bought a farm at Vegreville where I met my pride and joy, an Alberta Maid.  We lived there for seven years.  Ron and Bernice… were born in the Vegreville hospital.

In 1946 we bought the place where we now live [1974] from George Scorah who had bought it from the first owner in 1929.

Mr. Bruce McCleish was the one who owned it.  He came here in 1900 and ran the store and Post Office.

[H]e was also clerk of the Alberta court.  [W]hen we tore down the old house many court cases and history came to light.  In 1909 he left for Edmonton.  In 1910 and 1911 Harry Elliott lived here; Dan Hayes and Smith farmed it till 1915 when Mr. G. Duffy came in 1916 and farmed it till 1929 when it was sold to G. Scorah.  John deJong lived in the house later.

During our lifetime we have seen the passing of the country schools, old Dobbin no longer pulls the plow, and the binder is no more.  As we move up to the jet age let us not forget the pioneer wife and mother of those early days, their love and devotion to a cause they treasured we will never forget.  Also let us have a warm spot for the beast of burden that paved the way to our present way of life.

‘You poor old oxen what brought you here,

You plowed and sowed for many a year;

With kicks and knocks and other abuse

And now you are here in the thresherman’s stew.’

S1/2 5,40-24-4

One of the Houses Built by Eugene Bashaw

In Alix, Alberta on February 11, 2019 at 12:35 PM

from Pioneers and Progress, Alix Clive Historical Club, 1974

Jamieson house on Rodono Farm

Children’s Garden Show Alix

In Alix, Alberta, Fairs, Gardens on February 6, 2019 at 11:03 AM

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